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Next Generation May Embrace (the Mark of the Beast) Being 'Chipped'...666
# The Technology for the Mark of the Beast is Here Now – Smart Skin…

And it will cause all, the small and the great, and the poor, and the free and the bond to have a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads and it will bring it about that no one may be able to buy or sell, except him who has the mark, either the name of the beast or the number of its name.  Apocalypse 13:16-17  Confraternity Edition Bible 1941

And another, a third angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If anyone worships the beast and its image and receives a mark upon his forehead or upon his hand, he also shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, which is poured unmixed into the cup of his wrath; and he shall be tormented with fire and brimstone in the sight of the holy angels and n the sight of the Lamb.   Apocalypse 14:9-10  Confraternity Edition Bible 1941

** Editors Comment:  ** The Douay Rheims Bible is an English translation of St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate Bible.  The Latin word for IN’ orON’ is the same: IN.’  The Greek Bible has different words forIN’: is ΣΕ or σε and `ON’: is επί or ΓΙΑ.  Hence, the Confraternity Edition Bible 1941 used the Greek for the correct interpretations for the Mark of the Beast.

University of Illinois reported on August 11, 2011:

Engineers have developed a device platform that combines electronic components for sensing, medical diagnostics, communications and human-machine interfaces, all on an ultrathin skin-like patch that mounts directly onto the skin with the ease, flexibility and comfort of a temporary tattoo.

Led by John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder professor of engineering at the University of Illinois, the researchers described their novel skin-mounted electronics in the Aug. 12 issue of the journal Science.

The circuit bends, wrinkles and stretches with the mechanical properties of skin. The researchers demonstrated their concept through a diverse array of electronic components mounted on a thin, rubbery substrate, including sensors, LEDs, transistors, radio frequency capacitors, wireless antennas, and conductive coils and solar cells for power.

“We threw everything in our bag of tricks onto that platform, and then added a few other new ideas on top of those, to show that we could make it work,” said Rogers, a professor of materials science and engineering, of chemistry, of mechanical science and engineering, of bioengineering and of electrical and computer engineering. He also is affiliated with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and with the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at U. of I.

The patches are initially mounted on a thin sheet of water-soluble plastic, then laminated to the skin with water – just like applying a temporary tattoo. Alternately, the electronic components can be applied directly to a temporary tattoo itself, providing concealment for the electronics.

“We think this could be an important conceptual advance in wearable electronics, to achieve something that is almost unnoticeable to the wearer,” said U. of I. electrical and computer engineering professor Todd Coleman, who co-led the multi-disciplinary team. “The technology can connect you to the physical world and the cyberworld in a very natural way that feels very comfortable.”

Skin-mounted electronics have many biomedical applications, including EEG and EMG sensors to monitor nerve and muscle activity. One major advantage of skin-like circuits is that they don’t require conductive gel, tape, skin-penetrating pins or bulky wires, which can be uncomfortable for the user and limit coupling efficiency. They are much more comfortable and less cumbersome than traditional electrodes and give the wearers complete freedom of movement.

“If we want to understand brain function in a natural environment, that’s completely incompatible with EEG studies in a laboratory,” said Coleman, now a professor at the University of California at San Diego. “The best way to do this is to record neural signals in natural settings, with devices that are invisible to the user.”

Monitoring in a natural environment during normal activity is especially beneficial for continuous monitoring of health and wellness, cognitive state or behavioral patterns during sleep.

In addition to gathering data, skin-mounted electronics could provide the wearers with added capabilities. For example, patients with muscular or neurological disorders, such as ALS, could use them to communicate or to interface with computers. The researchers found that, when applied to the skin of the throat, the sensors could distinguish muscle movement for simple speech. The researchers have even used the electronic patches to control a video game, demonstrating the potential for human-computer interfacing.

Rogers’ group is well known for its innovative stretchable, flexible devices, but creating devices that could comfortably contort with the skin required a new fabrication paradigm.

“Our previous stretchable electronic devices are not well-matched to the mechanophysiology of the skin,” Rogers said. “In particular, the skin is extremely soft, by comparison, and its surface can be rough, with significant microscopic texture. These features demanded different kinds of approaches and design principles.”

Rogers collaborated with Northwestern University engineering professor Yonggang Huang and his group to tackle the difficult mechanics and materials questions. The team developed a device geometry they call filamentary serpentine, in which the circuits for the various devices are fabricated as tiny, squiggled wires. When mounted on thin, soft rubber sheets, the wavy, snakelike shape allows them to bend, twist, scrunch and stretch while maintaining functionality.

“The blurring of electronics and biology is really the key point here,” Huang said. “All established forms of electronics are hard, rigid. Biology is soft, elastic. It’s two different worlds. This is a way to truly integrate them.”

The researchers used simple adaptations of techniques used in the semiconductor industry, so the patches are easily scalable and manufacturable. The device company mc10, which Rogers co-founded, already is working to commercialize certain versions of the technology.

Next, the researchers are working to integrate the various devices mounted on the platform so that they work together as a system, rather than individually functioning devices, and to add Wi-Fi capability.

“The vision is to exploit these concepts in systems that have self-contained, integrated functionality, perhaps ultimately working in a therapeutic fashion with closed feedback control based on integrated sensors, in a coordinated manner with the body itself,” Rogers said.

India Launches Project to ID 1.2 Billion People…

****Wall Street Journal reported on September 29, 2010:

India’s vaunted tech savvy is being put to the test this week as the country embarks on a daunting mission: assigning a unique 12-digit number to each of its 1.2 billion people.

The project, which seeks to collect fingerprint and iris scans from all residents and store them in a massive central database of unique IDs, is considered by many specialists the most technologically and logistically complex national identification effort ever attempted. To pull it off, India has recruited tech gurus of Indian origin from around the world, including the co-founder of online photo service Snapfish and employees from Google Inc., Yahoo Inc. and Intel Corp.

The country’s leaders are pinning their hopes on the program to solve development problems that have persisted despite fast economic growth. They say unique ID numbers will help ensure that government welfare spending reaches the right people, and will allow hundreds of millions of poor Indians to access services like banking for the first time.

Critics question whether the project can have as big an impact as its backers promise, given that identity fraud is but one contributor to India’s development struggles. Civil-liberties groups say the government is collecting too much personal information without sufficient safeguards. The technology requires transferring large amounts of data between the hinterland and an urban database, leading some to question whether the system will succumb to India’s rickety Internet infrastructure.

The sign-up effort is already under way in a handful of districts, and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh is expected to kick off nationwide enrollment Wednesday. The government hopes to issue the first 100 million unique ID numbers by March and 600 million within four years. The undertaking is the latest chance for India to show it can pull off a massive project after what is widely viewed as its mishandling of next week’s Commonwealth Games in New Delhi, where infrastructure and hygiene issues led some nations to threaten withdrawing.

Subdermal chipThe Next Generation May Embrace (the Mark of the Beast) Being ‘Chipped…

PCWorld reported on June 12, 2010:

You may reject the idea of a microchip implant, but your grandchildren could embrace them, according to an Australian professor.

Katrina Michael, associate professor of the University of Wollongong’s school of information systems and technology, and author of scientific paper Towards a State of Uberveillance, said subdermal chip implants in humans could be commonplace within two to three generations.

But at present, she regards the device as a threat to life and liberty because technologists and politicians largely do not know if silicon chips could harm the human body and have not determined the terms in which the devices can be used.

“You will have a new breed of tech-savvy individuals that are more adaptable to technologies. But you could forget about getting Australians to have chip implants now,” Michael said.

“For instance [microchips] are problematic for motoring patients with psychological conditions. You may need to balance the patient’s well being, public safety and their ability to consent to the implant.”

Michael said human microchips could rid chronic illness sufferers from the need to visit hospital by sending simple data on their health to a doctor.

However, she said chip implants presently cause damage to the human body because they fuse with tissue and cause damage when removed.

“At this moment, there will be no contingency plan; it will be a life sentence to upgrades, virus protection mechanisms, and inescapable intrusion,” authors, Katina and M.G Michael wrote in their paper.

She noted that some 900 US hospitals have registered for a microchip-based patient identification system to more quickly identify patients admitted to emergency.

“There hasn’t been 50 cases of people using microchips in Australia, which is a fundamental problem for politicians because they do not want to touch the issue if it isn’t detailed in black and white,” Michael said.

She described seeing “a lot of blank faces” when she spoke to politicians of the privacy implications of wearable and implantable Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) chips, but noted “new breed politicians” such as Labor Senator Kate Lundy understood the technology and its dilemmas.

“It is a fallacy to speak of a balance between [freedom, security and justice] in the microchip scenario, so long as someone else has the potential to control the implant device,” the authors wrote in their paper.

The microchip devices could see a new social segregation in the form of “electronic apartheid,” computer virus infections that interfere with pacemakers, and a wealth of unknown health problems, the authors contend.

The advent of subdermal microchips is part of what the authors call ‘uberveillance,’ which connotes the ability to automatically locate and identify individuals, and can be used to as a predictive mechanism for behavior and traits.

Google Latitude typifies the term at present, Michael said, along with subdermal microchips and social networking tools.

She is currently testing the appeal of location-tracking through a pilot in which university students signed-up to the mobile location tool, Google Latitude, and recorded the amount of times they checked on the whereabouts of other participants.

Michael said students and respondents to earlier trials were surprised by how often they used the tool. Yet for all the data collected by ‘uberveillance’ technologies, Michael warns the actions or whereabouts of individuals cannot be guaranteed.

“There will be problems. We will have too much data and not enough knowledge,” she said.

** National ID Card, RFID Chip, and Mark of the Beast Coming Soon says Congressman Ron Paul…**

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